Global Institutional Justice – A Chimera?

By Deepanshu Mohan (@prats1810), O.P. Jindal Global University A United Nations tribunal constituted under Annex VII to the United Nations Convention (UNC) on the Law of the Sea at Hague submitted its verdict recently on a unilateral arbitration instituted by Philippines on June 21st, 2013 questioning the validity of China’s “nine-dash line” claims in the South China Sea … Continue reading Global Institutional Justice – A Chimera?

How did the EU ban on tobacco advertising transfer to some of the Swiss cantons?

By Philipp Trein, University of Lausanne The image of smoking changed in recent decades. Instead of a well-deserved pleasure, cigarette consumption is considered to be above all a serious health hazard. In many countries, governments banned smoking in public places, increased cigarette taxes, and prohibited tobacco advertising and sponsoring of events by tobacco corporations. Limiting advertising … Continue reading How did the EU ban on tobacco advertising transfer to some of the Swiss cantons?

Does measuring poverty multidimensionally make a difference?

By Rod Hick (@rodhick), Cardiff University  Does measuring poverty multidimensionally make a difference in terms of who we identify as being poor? In recent years, a growing number of analysts have called for poverty measurement to go beyond a focus on income alone, to consider a wider range of deprivations a person may experience. The … Continue reading Does measuring poverty multidimensionally make a difference?

JPP Issue 36.3 (September 2016) FREE through September

The September issue of JPP is free to download here and for the next two months. This issue includes the following: The political economy of tax enforcement: a look at the Internal Revenue Service from 1978 to 2010 by Sutirtha Bagchi Happy taxation: increasing tax compliance through positive rewards? by Hilke Brockmann, Philipp Genschel and Laura Seelkopf The electoral foundations to noncompliance: addressing … Continue reading JPP Issue 36.3 (September 2016) FREE through September

How Oil & Gas Pipelines Abuse Private Property Owners

By Ronald Fraser, PhD Starting in the late 1800s, state and federal legislatures began delegating their sovereign eminent domain police powers to oil and gas pipeline companies. A growing nation needed a dependable supply of fossil fuels. Since then, even now as evidence mounts that burning fossil fuels is a threat to the well-being of the … Continue reading How Oil & Gas Pipelines Abuse Private Property Owners

Up in Arms: The Battle Lines of Today’s Debates Over Gun Control, Stand-Your-Ground Issues, and Other Violence-Related Issues

    By Colin Woodard Cross-Post Originally Published 2013 In December 2012, when Adam Lanza stormed into the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, with a rifle and killed twenty children and six adult staff members, the United States found itself immersed in debates about gun control. Another flash point occurred in July 2013, when George … Continue reading Up in Arms: The Battle Lines of Today’s Debates Over Gun Control, Stand-Your-Ground Issues, and Other Violence-Related Issues

The Future of the Sharing Economy: Let’s Get It Right!

By Vasil Stoynov, Free University Berlin “I don’t need a drill. I need a hole in my wall.”[1] This is the slogan of the various new startups and enterprises that nowadays represent the concept of the “sharing economy.” One of the most successful and prominent examples of these new wave business models is the car-sharing service Uber, … Continue reading The Future of the Sharing Economy: Let’s Get It Right!

Business Interests and the Waxman-Markey Climate Bill: Who Lobbied?

By Johannes Urpelainen (@jurpelai), Columbia University Cross-post, Originally Published February 9, 2015 In environmental and energy policy, business interests often play an important role. Businesses have the resources to invest into lobbying for their preferred positions. Environmentalists often complain about the advantages that polluters enjoy in the political process due to their ability to “buy” … Continue reading Business Interests and the Waxman-Markey Climate Bill: Who Lobbied?

JPP Issue 36.2 (June 2016) FREE through July 10th

The June issue of JPP is free to download now here and for the next two months. Feel free to share this hefty dose of public policy education far and wide. This issue includes the following:  A defence of participation income by Cristian Pérez-Muñoz Issue expertise in policymaking by Peter J. May, Chris Koski and Nicholas Stramp Explaining styles of political judgement in … Continue reading JPP Issue 36.2 (June 2016) FREE through July 10th

Paradigm Shift in Human Services Delivery in the United States: A Change in Approach from the Government to the Governance Model

By Shabu Varghese, University of Central Florida  Introduction Organized societies experienced dramatic changes in their methods of solving public problems since the mid-nineteenth century. The existing literature on different disciplines also supported the trend of changing methods for tackling those complex problems in different countries. Salamon (2002) described this movement or change as a “revolution” that has … Continue reading Paradigm Shift in Human Services Delivery in the United States: A Change in Approach from the Government to the Governance Model