Why the War on Poverty Failed

By Nicolas Duquette, University of Southern California Fifty years ago this year, the central piece of Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty -- the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 (EOA) -- was passed. This law was unusual both in its ambition to eliminate US poverty and in its implementation. Instead of directing funds to state anti-poverty … Continue reading Why the War on Poverty Failed

Do the Poor Benefit From More Generous Medicaid Physician Payments?

By Alice Chen, University of Chicago, Booth School of Business There is a growing concern that too few physicians are willing to accept Medicaid patients. One way to encourage Medicaid supply is to pay doctors more for performing Medicaid-covered procedures. However, we lack a holistic understanding of how changes to Medicaid payments affect access to care … Continue reading Do the Poor Benefit From More Generous Medicaid Physician Payments?

Amid the Noise About the ACA, Public Options Are Breaking Silos

By Howard Kahn (@LACareHealth), L.A. Care Health Plan Six months ago, open enrollment began under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplaces. It is arguably the single biggest moment in U.S. health policy since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. Has it been perfect? No, of course not, and even the President admitted to … Continue reading Amid the Noise About the ACA, Public Options Are Breaking Silos

Health Care Reform: A Bipartisan Issue

By Rebecca Pizzitola, University at Albany School of Public Health In the United States, we've been talking a lot about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), or “Obamacare”. We have heard President Obama and health policy experts claim that it will be a safety net not only for the poor but also for the middle class by … Continue reading Health Care Reform: A Bipartisan Issue