JPP Editorial Board: 2017-2018

We are excited to announce our updated JPP Editorial Board! Please join us in welcoming our new members.  Marisa Abrajano, University of California San Diego, USA Frank R. Baumgartner, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Tim Besley, London School of Economics Evelyn Z. Brodkin Daniel Carpenter Joshua Clinton Pepper Culpepper Keith Dowding Fabio Franchino Sean Gailmard Francesca … Continue reading JPP Editorial Board: 2017-2018

Global Institutional Justice – A Chimera?

By Deepanshu Mohan (@prats1810), O.P. Jindal Global University A United Nations tribunal constituted under Annex VII to the United Nations Convention (UNC) on the Law of the Sea at Hague submitted its verdict recently on a unilateral arbitration instituted by Philippines on June 21st, 2013 questioning the validity of China’s “nine-dash line” claims in the South China Sea … Continue reading Global Institutional Justice – A Chimera?

How did the EU ban on tobacco advertising transfer to some of the Swiss cantons?

By Philipp Trein, University of Lausanne The image of smoking changed in recent decades. Instead of a well-deserved pleasure, cigarette consumption is considered to be above all a serious health hazard. In many countries, governments banned smoking in public places, increased cigarette taxes, and prohibited tobacco advertising and sponsoring of events by tobacco corporations. Limiting advertising … Continue reading How did the EU ban on tobacco advertising transfer to some of the Swiss cantons?

Does measuring poverty multidimensionally make a difference?

By Rod Hick (@rodhick), Cardiff University  Does measuring poverty multidimensionally make a difference in terms of who we identify as being poor? In recent years, a growing number of analysts have called for poverty measurement to go beyond a focus on income alone, to consider a wider range of deprivations a person may experience. The … Continue reading Does measuring poverty multidimensionally make a difference?

JPP Issue 36.3 (September 2016) FREE through September

The September issue of JPP is free to download here and for the next two months. This issue includes the following: The political economy of tax enforcement: a look at the Internal Revenue Service from 1978 to 2010 by Sutirtha Bagchi Happy taxation: increasing tax compliance through positive rewards? by Hilke Brockmann, Philipp Genschel and Laura Seelkopf The electoral foundations to noncompliance: addressing … Continue reading JPP Issue 36.3 (September 2016) FREE through September

How Oil & Gas Pipelines Abuse Private Property Owners

By Ronald Fraser, PhD Starting in the late 1800s, state and federal legislatures began delegating their sovereign eminent domain police powers to oil and gas pipeline companies. A growing nation needed a dependable supply of fossil fuels. Since then, even now as evidence mounts that burning fossil fuels is a threat to the well-being of the … Continue reading How Oil & Gas Pipelines Abuse Private Property Owners

Up in Arms: The Battle Lines of Today’s Debates Over Gun Control, Stand-Your-Ground Issues, and Other Violence-Related Issues

    By Colin Woodard Cross-Post Originally Published 2013 In December 2012, when Adam Lanza stormed into the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, with a rifle and killed twenty children and six adult staff members, the United States found itself immersed in debates about gun control. Another flash point occurred in July 2013, when George … Continue reading Up in Arms: The Battle Lines of Today’s Debates Over Gun Control, Stand-Your-Ground Issues, and Other Violence-Related Issues

The Future of the Sharing Economy: Let’s Get It Right!

By Vasil Stoynov, Free University Berlin “I don’t need a drill. I need a hole in my wall.”[1] This is the slogan of the various new startups and enterprises that nowadays represent the concept of the “sharing economy.” One of the most successful and prominent examples of these new wave business models is the car-sharing service Uber, … Continue reading The Future of the Sharing Economy: Let’s Get It Right!

Business Interests and the Waxman-Markey Climate Bill: Who Lobbied?

By Johannes Urpelainen (@jurpelai), Columbia University Cross-post, Originally Published February 9, 2015 In environmental and energy policy, business interests often play an important role. Businesses have the resources to invest into lobbying for their preferred positions. Environmentalists often complain about the advantages that polluters enjoy in the political process due to their ability to “buy” … Continue reading Business Interests and the Waxman-Markey Climate Bill: Who Lobbied?

JPP Issue 36.2 (June 2016) FREE through July 10th

The June issue of JPP is free to download now here and for the next two months. Feel free to share this hefty dose of public policy education far and wide. This issue includes the following:  A defence of participation income by Cristian Pérez-Muñoz Issue expertise in policymaking by Peter J. May, Chris Koski and Nicholas Stramp Explaining styles of political judgement in … Continue reading JPP Issue 36.2 (June 2016) FREE through July 10th

Paradigm Shift in Human Services Delivery in the United States: A Change in Approach from the Government to the Governance Model

By Shabu Varghese, University of Central Florida  Introduction Organized societies experienced dramatic changes in their methods of solving public problems since the mid-nineteenth century. The existing literature on different disciplines also supported the trend of changing methods for tackling those complex problems in different countries. Salamon (2002) described this movement or change as a “revolution” that has … Continue reading Paradigm Shift in Human Services Delivery in the United States: A Change in Approach from the Government to the Governance Model

The Decline of Public Reasoning and Need for Collective Reflection: Revisiting Sen

By Deepanshu Mohan (@prats1810), O.P. Jindal Global University “The pursuit of reason and rejection of traditionalism are so brilliantly patent as to be above the need of argument”, once said Akbar[i] to his trusted friend, Abul Fazl[ii]. At a time when debates on nationalism, anti-nationalism and what constitutes the idea of India did not emerge; Akbar in … Continue reading The Decline of Public Reasoning and Need for Collective Reflection: Revisiting Sen

Ticking Time Bomb –The Indian Banking System

By Ashish Pandey, Quadrature Capital LLC Indian public sector banks have once again delivered quarterly financial results that will hardly cheer anybody. A deep-dive analysis of statistical data released by Reserve Bank of India on December 23, 2015 shows that India is currently staring at a crisis of unprecedented magnitude. Non-Performing Assets (“NPAs”) in the … Continue reading Ticking Time Bomb –The Indian Banking System

Transparency in Policing through NYPD’s Citizens Police Academy

By Alfred S. Titus, Jr. (@DrDet1) With all the controversy and calls for transparency in policing today, a little-known catalyst exist in New York City that helps bring clarity and understanding to the community.  The catalyst is the New York City Police Department’s Citizens Police Academy (CPA).  Since 1993, NYPD’s CPA has provided a bi-annual, 14-week … Continue reading Transparency in Policing through NYPD’s Citizens Police Academy

JPP Issue 36.1 (March 2016) FREE Through April 15th

From the editors: by Anthony Bertelli, Senior Executive Editor This issue introduces a new forum for debate and discussion of important ideas in the scholarly study of public policy. Our first ever discussion section is anchored in an essay by Keith Dowding, Andrew Hindmoor, and Aaron Martin entitled “The Comparative Policy Agendas Project: Theory, Measurement and Findings.” … Continue reading JPP Issue 36.1 (March 2016) FREE Through April 15th

JPP Issue 35.3 (December 2015) Revisited

In case you missed it during the holidays, our December issue was a great one! Scoring a number of tweets, citations and good old-fashioned joyful readers, here's the table of contents in case you wish to take another gander: Public information, public learning and public opinion: democratic accountability in education policy by Joshua D. Clinton and … Continue reading JPP Issue 35.3 (December 2015) Revisited

Geography, Institutions, State, and Technology: A New Endogenous Approach to Economics

By Deepanshu Mohan (@prats1810), O.P. Jindal Global University In a recent article published via Mint, the author, Arun Maira, argued for a “new economics” that does away with the economic models of yesteryears designed to cater different expectations in economies facing different stages of development. Economists like Barry Eichengreen, Dani Rodrik, Ha Joon Chang and others … Continue reading Geography, Institutions, State, and Technology: A New Endogenous Approach to Economics

Could public safety survive a one-sided gun lobbying for terrorism?

By Carole Audrey Nyemeck (@carolenyemeck) Cross-post from The Journal of Policy Innovations Originally posted February 5, 2016. In the 1700s, Adam Smith made the point that unlike what we might think, letting rich people become richer may have unintended social benefits for the whole society. He illustrated this point with a selfish landlord who, because his … Continue reading Could public safety survive a one-sided gun lobbying for terrorism?

Where Computers and Classrooms Meet – Policy Successes and Struggles in South Korean Education Reform

    By Charleen Chiong (@CNCharleen), University of Cambridge The tides are turning in classrooms in South Korea. In the 1960s, a wave of industrialization swept the young republic, causing rapid economic and educational growth. The roots of Confucian philosophy remain: the community places a high premium on education, and the system is rigid and hierarchical, … Continue reading Where Computers and Classrooms Meet – Policy Successes and Struggles in South Korean Education Reform

On the Harvard Dataverse Network Project – an open-source tool for data sharing

By Samuel Moore (@samoore_), King's College London Cross-post from LSE Originally published December 31, 2013. The Harvard Dataverse Network is an open-source platform that facilitates data sharing.Samuel Moore outlines how this customisable initiative might be adopted by journals, disciplines and individuals. I am a huge fan of grass-roots approaches to scholarly openness. Successful community-led initiatives tend … Continue reading On the Harvard Dataverse Network Project – an open-source tool for data sharing

A Paradigm Shift in Human Services Delivery in the United States: A Change in Approach From the Government to the Governance Model

By Shabu Varghese, University of Central Florida Organized societies experienced dramatic changes in their methods of solving public problems since the mid-nineteenth century. Salamon (2002) has described this movement as a “revolution” that has taken place in the United States and in other countries that has been going on for more than 50 years. During this … Continue reading A Paradigm Shift in Human Services Delivery in the United States: A Change in Approach From the Government to the Governance Model

Proposal of a Dignity Scale for Sustainable Governance

                By Nayef Al-Rodhan (@SustainHistory), University of Oxford[i]  In October 2005, two North African teenagers died of electrocution in one of the banlieues of Paris as they were running from the police through a dangerous power substation. An inquiry later established the teens were innocent, and the incident sparked some … Continue reading Proposal of a Dignity Scale for Sustainable Governance

Price-Insensitive Enrollees Could Increase Costs of the WIC Program – Can Reference Pricing Help?

By Akash A. Desai, Beghou Consulting The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a federally funded program in the United States that provides grants to states for supplemental food, education, and referral services to low-income pregnant, postpartum women, and to infants and children up to 5 years of age found to be … Continue reading Price-Insensitive Enrollees Could Increase Costs of the WIC Program – Can Reference Pricing Help?

The Changing Global Perception on the Death Penalty

By Eric E. Hack, Walden University The global perception of the death penalty is definitely changing.  Capital punishment is an age old response to certain crimes.  Some crimes punishable by death once included adultery, blasphemy, and questioning the government (Roth 2011).  In most countries in the world today, especially in free societies, adultery and blasphemy are … Continue reading The Changing Global Perception on the Death Penalty

How Exactly Has American and Global Society Benefited From Our 50+-Year “War on Drugs”?

By Eric E. Hack, Walden University American society has benefited in odd ways from the “War on Drugs.” Middle-class, middle-aged, suburbanite property owners clearly feel safer knowing the American government is willing to throw the book at outsiders in possession of small amounts of marijuana. I suppose that level of security and the peace of mind … Continue reading How Exactly Has American and Global Society Benefited From Our 50+-Year “War on Drugs”?

Predisposed Tabula Rasa

    By Nayef Al-Rodhan (@SustainHistory), University of Oxford[i] Studies of human behavior and psychology have received extensive attention in public policy. Economists, social theorists and philosophers have long analyzed the incentives of human actions, decision making, rationality, motivation, and other cognitive processes. More recently, the study of happiness furthered the debate in public policy, as many … Continue reading Predisposed Tabula Rasa

Changing the Ways of a Lion: Policy Challenges in Fostering 21st-Century Skills – The Case of Singapore

By Charleen Chiong, Oxford University Singapore’s education system attracts great interest from educationalists all over the world. Despite being a relatively small, young country with few natural resources, Singapore – also popularly called the ‘Lion City’ by its politicians and people – has consistently remained amongst the top performers since it joined the OECD’s Programme … Continue reading Changing the Ways of a Lion: Policy Challenges in Fostering 21st-Century Skills – The Case of Singapore

JPP Issue 35.1: FREE to Read Until the End of April

The first issue of the year is now out in print! This means you have a little time to read and download it free here--until the end of April. This issue includes: Gendered diffusion on gendered issues: the case of human trafficking: By Vanessa Bouché and Dana E. Wittmer High profile rape trials and policy advocacy: By … Continue reading JPP Issue 35.1: FREE to Read Until the End of April

The Implications of Behavioral Economics for Pension Plan Design

By David Hollanders, University of Amsterdam For all their varieties, a common feature of pension reforms in the last decades has been the shifting of risks from employers to employees. Closely accompanying this shift is a discussion of the desirability to shift control to employees as well, that is, to increase individual choice in pension … Continue reading The Implications of Behavioral Economics for Pension Plan Design

A discussion on the Lessons of Education Reform in Singapore and its Relevance to Better Policy

  By Jian Feng (@1instathink), Instathink  Education in Singapore has traditionally been focused on excellence, with an emphasis on mathematics and science and students performing well on international tests. Having a focus on excellence based on Confucian1 ethics like hard work is desirable in a country that has to rely on developing its human capital … Continue reading A discussion on the Lessons of Education Reform in Singapore and its Relevance to Better Policy

Budgeting and Implementing Fiscal Policy in Italy

By Alessandra Cepparulo, Francesca Gastaldi, Luisa Giuriato, & Agnese Sacchi of IDEAS The importance of fiscal forecasting The importance of public finance control has increased over time, as many developed countries are currently facing record debt and deficit levels associated with structural economic imbalances. These circumstances enhance the necessity of sound institutional system growth and highlight … Continue reading Budgeting and Implementing Fiscal Policy in Italy

Measuring Corruption

By Paul M. Heywood (@pmheywood) & Jonathan Rose, University of Nottingham The World Economic Forum estimates the cost of corruption to be more than 5% of global GDP (US $2.6 trillion), and the World Bank believes over $1 trillion is paid in bribes each year. Of course, given the secretive nature of corrupt exchanges, we cannot know … Continue reading Measuring Corruption

The Human Capacity for Transformational Change: Harnessing the Collective Mind

Book Review By Jackie Ohlin, University of Technology, Sydney This is a vitally important book for social scientists and all concerned with being open to new ways of addressing complex issues within our communities. It examines our capacity, as individuals and together, to bring about transformational change – not any change, mind you, but the … Continue reading The Human Capacity for Transformational Change: Harnessing the Collective Mind

The New Regulatory Space: Reframing Democratic Governance

Book Review By Gergana Yankova-Dimova, University of Cambridge The book “The New Regulatory Space” delivers a masterfully well-reasoned defense of regulation. The regulatory space is analyzed with regard to four systems of authority--the market, democratic politics, the law, and social norms. The book outlines and defends the contributions of the regulatory space to each of … Continue reading The New Regulatory Space: Reframing Democratic Governance

JPP Issue 34.3: Free 10/15/14

We now have First View to help us publish the manuscripts we have accepted well in advance of their print date. Further, oftentimes these manuscripts are available online individually well before the issue as a whole is available. But, in favor of supporting a cohesive approach to reading JPP, we will begin to publish each issue's table of … Continue reading JPP Issue 34.3: Free 10/15/14

What is the Future of Water Governance Scholarship?

By Raul Pacheco-Vega (@raulpacheco), Centre for Economic Research and Training Governance is such an elusive concept to define, even though public policy scholars have been drawn to it almost naturally. My first exposure to the literature on governance occurred while I was studying for my PhD comprehensive exams. I became obsessed with the work of … Continue reading What is the Future of Water Governance Scholarship?

Why the War on Poverty Failed

By Nicolas Duquette, University of Southern California Fifty years ago this year, the central piece of Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty -- the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 (EOA) -- was passed. This law was unusual both in its ambition to eliminate US poverty and in its implementation. Instead of directing funds to state anti-poverty … Continue reading Why the War on Poverty Failed

“Rules for Fools”

By Andy Whitford (@abwhitford), University of Georgia This is an excerpt from Above Politics: Bureaucratic Discretion and Credible Commitment, written with Gary J. Miller of Washington University in St. Louis. This book manuscript is under contract with Cambridge University Press. It is not yet accepted for publication though. One important legacy of the Great Recession … Continue reading “Rules for Fools”

How Presidential Appointees (or Lack Thereof) Matter

                    By William Resh (@billresh), University of Southern California As Gary Hollibaugh, Jr. and colleagues plainly stated on the LSE blog, “Presidential appointees matter.” Of course, this is of little question when these positions are filled. Incompetent appointees cause deleterious consequences for both citizens and presidents. … Continue reading How Presidential Appointees (or Lack Thereof) Matter

Do the Poor Benefit From More Generous Medicaid Physician Payments?

By Alice Chen, University of Chicago, Booth School of Business There is a growing concern that too few physicians are willing to accept Medicaid patients. One way to encourage Medicaid supply is to pay doctors more for performing Medicaid-covered procedures. However, we lack a holistic understanding of how changes to Medicaid payments affect access to care … Continue reading Do the Poor Benefit From More Generous Medicaid Physician Payments?

The EU‘s Foreign Policy: What Kind of Power and Diplomatic Action?

Book Review By Eleni Xiarchogiannopoulou, Institute for European Studies The global role of the EU in the post-Lisbon Treaty era and in a multi-polar world has been the focus of numerous academic and policymaking debates. This is exactly the topic of the timely volume The EU‘s Foreign Policy: What Kind of Power and Diplomatic Action? … Continue reading The EU‘s Foreign Policy: What Kind of Power and Diplomatic Action?

Amid the Noise About the ACA, Public Options Are Breaking Silos

By Howard Kahn (@LACareHealth), L.A. Care Health Plan Six months ago, open enrollment began under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplaces. It is arguably the single biggest moment in U.S. health policy since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. Has it been perfect? No, of course not, and even the President admitted to … Continue reading Amid the Noise About the ACA, Public Options Are Breaking Silos

The Changing Ideology of the American Voter

By Josh Zingher, Binghamton University Cross-post from The Quantitative Peace and LSE Originally Published March 27, 2014 Demographic changes mean that traditional Republican constituencies are shrinking as the Democrats grow.  It is difficult to discuss electoral politics in the United States without talking in terms of social groups. Journalistic accounts of party competition often stress … Continue reading The Changing Ideology of the American Voter

JPP Issue 34.2: Letter from the Editors

By Anthony Bertelli (@tonybertelli), University of Southern California and Peter John (@peterjohn10), University College London We are now about halfway through our five-year term of office as editors of JPP. It is good moment to reflect on our achievements so far and to consider what is to come next. We hope you think it is fair to say that … Continue reading JPP Issue 34.2: Letter from the Editors

Ties That Count: Explaining Interest Group Access to Policymakers

By Jan Beyers (@JanBeyers2), University of Antwerp & Caelesta Braun, Vu University Amsterdam *The authors received the BVPA Publication Award for their article in 2014. Why coalition positions matter for access to policymakers Getting a foot in the government’s door is one of the core challenges for interest groups to successfully influence public policy. While outside lobbying and … Continue reading Ties That Count: Explaining Interest Group Access to Policymakers

With Nearly 1 Million Unemployed Youths in the UK, New Policy Proposals Aimed at Tackling the Issue Are Necessary

By Nye Cominetti, Socio-Economic Centre Cross-post from LSE, Originally Published March 12, 2014 The government’s policies aimed at tackling youth unemployment in the UK have so far been disappointing: wage incentive payments have had little impact, and there has been less uptake of the government’s apprenticeship scheme than targeted. Thankfully, Nick Clegg has recently come out with … Continue reading With Nearly 1 Million Unemployed Youths in the UK, New Policy Proposals Aimed at Tackling the Issue Are Necessary

Designing Social Policy with the Ballot

By Craig Burnett, University of North Carolina at Wilmington Direct democracy offers voters a unique opportunity to effect policy change. Through initiatives, citizens are able to modify their state’s statutes and constitution without relying on — or, in some cases, without interference from — a legislative body. For referendums, voters have the chance to weigh in on … Continue reading Designing Social Policy with the Ballot

Health Care Reform: A Bipartisan Issue

By Rebecca Pizzitola, University at Albany School of Public Health In the United States, we've been talking a lot about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), or “Obamacare”. We have heard President Obama and health policy experts claim that it will be a safety net not only for the poor but also for the middle class by … Continue reading Health Care Reform: A Bipartisan Issue

Adjusting Public Finances By Cutting Welfare is Too Simplistic

By Georg Wenzelburger, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität FreiburgCross-post from LSE, Originally Published February 12, 2014The argument that cutting social spending is an essential part of necessary fiscal adjustments is pervasive. That slashing welfare does not harm economic growth while tax hikes do is treated as received wisdom by many academics and policymakers. Georg Wenzelburger deconstructs the argument in favour of welfare … Continue reading Adjusting Public Finances By Cutting Welfare is Too Simplistic

JPP Issue 34.1: Letter from the Editors

By Anthony Bertelli (@tonybertelli), University of Southern California and Peter John (@peterjohn10), University College London Issue 34.1 of the Journal of Public Policy goes to print this coming April. But, given that all the articles published in this issue are already available online via FirstView, we thought it wise to share our letter from the editors here with … Continue reading JPP Issue 34.1: Letter from the Editors

Regaining Political Control Over the British Quango State: The Public Bodies Reform

By Haram Lee, University of Southern California In Britain, quangos (quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisations) have been an integral part of the British government. The history of these special-purpose agencies working at an arm’s length distance from the ministers goes as far as the 17th century. Before the current Coalition Government came into power, Britain was in … Continue reading Regaining Political Control Over the British Quango State: The Public Bodies Reform

Appropriate Responses to Natural Disasters

By Martin Livermore (@scialliance), The Scientific Alliance Typhoon Haiyan has been a personal tragedy for many Filipinos. The pictures of destruction, the heartrending stories of loss and the inability to get aid delivered quickly because of damage to infrastructure highlighted once again the terrible forces that Nature can unleash. This coincided with the latest round … Continue reading Appropriate Responses to Natural Disasters

What Can Reversion Points Teach Us About Public Policy?

By Giacomo Benedetto (@ggbenedetto), University of London Resort to reversion points is what happens in politics and policy where a failure to reach a decision has a consequence other than continuing the status quo. If there is no agreement and a reversion point takes effect, the political actor that can influence the reversion point has … Continue reading What Can Reversion Points Teach Us About Public Policy?

Advocating for Clean Technology

By Johannes Urpelainen (@jurpelai), Columbia University Many of today's environmental challenges could be solved with clean technology, such as wind or solar power. If technologies with negative environmental impacts were replaced with more sustainable alternatives, the environmental burden of human activity could be reduced. The technical solutions exist, and their deployment is ultimately a question of … Continue reading Advocating for Clean Technology

Giving That Introductory Lecture in Public Policy

By Peter John (@peterjohn10), University College London In the UK, we are at the start of the university term, and the new cohort of students has just arrived. Last week was their induction; this week the students receive their first lectures. I am teaching an introduction to public policy course for our master’s students, a module … Continue reading Giving That Introductory Lecture in Public Policy